NewsNotes
February 2005


NewsNotes is a monthly email update of goings-on at EPS. In it you will find information on current projects, announcements of upcoming events and publications, and an action corner. We would like to include information on what our members are doing. If you would like to submit information about an event or publication that you are involved with, please send an email to thea@epsusa.org. (The fine print - we reserve the right to edit submissions for space or content.)

In This Issue (click on a button or heading to jump to that section)
EPS News
Links
In Other News
Funding and Employment Opportunities
EPS Publications
Action Corner
Upcoming Events
How Can I Help?
EPS News
February 22, 2005: the Security Policy Working Group presents Home by Christmas? Near-term US Strategies for Exiting Iraq

10:30am - 1:00pm, Tuesday, February 22, 2005
Hyatt Regency Capitol Hill, 400 New Jersey Avenue NW, Washington, DC

Speakers will be:

  • Carl Conetta, co-director, Project on Defense Alternatives;
  • David Cortright, president, Fourth Freedom Forum; Fellow, Kroc Institute, University of Notre Dame;
  • Jamie Galbraith, University of Texas, School of Public Affairs; chair, Economists for Peace and Security;
  • Charles V. Peña, Director of Defense Studies, Cato Institute.

Contact: Sean Meyer, 413-259-9129, for more information & RSVP. smeyer@seanmeyer.com

US operations in Iraq will soon enter their third year. With the Iraqi election now complete and the costs of the occupation mounting daily, discussion of near-term US withdrawal has gained a new urgency – both here and in Iraq. But is it practical and how might it be done?

The panel will clarify options for the "near-term" withdrawal of US forces from Iraq – that is, withdrawal within a period of 12 (or so) months. While specifying, step by step, different possible paths out, panelists will also assess the practical difficulties, risks, and costs of withdrawal and attempt to answer the questions:

  • How might near-term withdrawal impact Iraq during this period of transition and reconstruction? Does military withdrawal mean "abandonment"?
  • Would withdrawal increase the likelihood of civil strife and boost the insurgency? How might the United States mitigate this and other possible negative effects of withdrawal in the near term?
  • How should we weigh the risks of withdrawal in terms of US goals and interests? What would near-term withdrawal imply about US goals and accomplishment in the country and region?
  • If we withdraw now, what mission have we accomplished?
  • How would withdrawal affect US regional standing and the war on terrorism?
March 4 - 6, 2005. The 31st annual Eastern Economic Association Conference will be held in New York, NY, at the Sheraton New York Hotel and Towers. EPS is hosting a session Saturday, March 5th, at 11:00am, on The Costs of War. The presenters will be:

* Jurgen Brauer, US Military Expenditure: Data, Models, Coefficients
* David Gold, The Economics of Terrorism and Counterterrorism
* Lawrence Klein, The Macroeconomics of Preventive War: What Has Iraq Done to the US Economy?

Conference program and other information are available at http://www.iona.edu/academic/arts_sci/orgs/eea/conf2005/NYhome.html.

 

Our full new contact information is as follows. Please note that there was a typo in last month's NewsNotes; the correct zip code is 12504.

Economists for Peace and Security
at the Levy Economics Institute
PO Box 5000
Annandale on Hudson, NY 12504

Tel: 845-758-0917
Fax: 845-758-1149

general email: info@epsusa.org

 

EPS Trustee Amartya Sen was a recent guest on the radio show "The Connection," discussing democracy, development and various freedoms, including "Freedom from Want." Listen to the 40 minute show at http://www.theconnection.org/shows/2005/02/20050211_a_main.asp

 

On February 14th, the editor of the Times of India writes, "Economists such as Amartya Sen have repeatedly stressed that rising military expenditure imposes substantial opportunity costs on government priorities like health and education. Despite this, India continues to be one of the biggest defense spenders. It is time we give up our obsession with guns and make a decisive choice in favor of hospitals and schools." http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/articleshow/1019729.cms

 
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Links

The National Priorities Project (an SPWG partner) has posted an analysis of the recently released budget request from the White House. The site includes charts detailing the cuts and increases in the Fiscal Year 2006 (FY06) budget, and a breakdown of each state's share of the costs. http://www.nationalpriorities.org/budget They have also updated the Tradeoffs section of the website to incorporate the new numbers at http://nationalpriorities.org/tradeoff

 

To look at the Defense Department's own budget materials for Fiscal Year 2006 (FY06), broken down by the following categories:

  • Military Personnel Programs
  • Operation and Maintenance Programs
  • Procurement Programs
  • Research, Development, Test & Evaluation Programs
  • Military Construction, Family Housing, and Base Realignment and Closure Program
  • Program Acquisition Costs by Weapon System

please visit http://www.dod.mil/comptroller/defbudget/fy2006/index.html

 
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In Other News

From TomPaine.com, Arianna Huffington writes about Iraq's Harry Truman "Way back in 1941, an unremarkable senator from Missouri took the remarkable step of organizing an investigative committee to scrutinize his own party's war budget and make sure it was free from waste and corruption. That senator was Harry S. Truman, who eventually became vice president and then president. Today, several brave senators from both sides of the aisle are taking similar action to ensure reconstruction money in Iraq is spent for reconstruction—not war profiteering." Read the article at http://www.tompaine.com/articles/iraqs_harry_truman.php See the Action Corner below for suggestions on contacting your Senators to encourage the formation of a Truman Committee on Iraq.

 

"President Bush says the 'state of the union is strong and confident.' But Americans and the rest of the world have good reason to be skeptical about the President's claims that his domestic and foreign policies are producing widespread prosperity and peace," writes Tom Barry, policy director of the International Relations Center (IRC). http://www.irc-online.org/content/commentary/2005/0502delusion.php

 

Make Art Not Nukes! Design Contest Calling all artists and designers! On May 1, 2005, there will be a huge demonstration in New York City highlighting the critical need to ban nuclear weapons. This event will be in the international spotlight, taking place the day before the Non-Proliferation Treaty Review at the UN. Mayors, artists, scientists, and students are preparing for it around the world as part of a massive coalition of organizations including UFPJ (United for Peace and Justice) and Abolition2000.

This event will be publicized with unique, eye-catching, heart-stopping imagery, reminding people that the nuclear issue isn't over. Abolition Now is asking artists to submit work that will be splashed on posters, banners, flyers, websites and T-shirts around the world. The work should be passionate and pointed, focused on this giant new effort to abolish nukes exactly 60 years after they destroyed Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Submitted work must be postmarked no later than March 1, 2005. Winners will receive $500 and lots of exposure when the work is printed on posters and other materials. A full list of rules and more information here: http://www.abolitionnow.org/may1contest.html.

 

From the February 07, 2005 edition of the Christian Science Monitor comes an article by Nancy Soderberg. The African Union Moves a Quiet Revolution "With the world focus on terrorism, the war in Iraq, and now the tsunami, there is some hidden good news, surprisingly in Africa. Over the past few years, there has been a quiet revolution occurring in Africa. For the first time, Africans are beginning to take responsibility for the continent's many conflicts. With the right international assistance, the effort can tip the balance from war to peace." http://www.csmonitor.com/2005/0207/p09s02-coop.html

 

Wiliiam Pitt, writing for TruthOut.org explains, "This Is What Tax Cuts and Stupid Wars Cost." Mr. Pitt asks, "Want to know what a $300 share of the tax cut and an ill-conceived and brainlessly executed war in Iraq get you?" The article includes a complete list of the programs that have been cut or terminated in the recent White House budget request. http://forum.truthout.org/blog/story/2005/2/13/135330/338

 

"Nigerian troops on Feb. 4 shot and killed four villagers who were protesting at the main export terminal run by ChevronTexaco in the Niger Delta," one of the demonstration's organizers told IRIN, the UN news agency. More than 200 protesters from the village of Ugborodo near Warri stormed the Escravos plant just before dawn to demand a fairer share of the 300,000 barrels of crude oil that are pumped out every day. "Soldiers shot at them, killing four and injuring three others," said Helen Joe, one of the activists' leaders.

ChevronTexaco's Nigerian subsidiary said in a statement that its Escravos facilities had been "forcibly entered" and they had reported the incident to the security forces "who have since contained it." The company declined to give further details and did not confirm the deaths or the injuries.

Full report: http://www.irinnews.org/report.asp?ReportID=45401

 

The 2004 Review - the Year in Small Arms from IANSA (International Action Network on Small Arms) is up on their website. http://www.iansa.org/documents/2004/iansa_2004_wrap_up_revised.doc

The summary begins, "In 2004, the damage caused by the proliferation and misuse of small arms continued largely unchecked despite the intensive efforts of NGOs, UN agencies and progressive governments. Small arms were the direct cause of widespread death and injury, and indirectly had significant humanitarian consequences. In Iraq, ongoing fighting around rebel strongholds produced some of the most numerous casualties of the conflict. 2004 will also be remembered as the year the world came to see the genocidal acts of the Sudanese-supported janjaweed against civilians, though the failure among media as well as NGOs to connect this story to small arms proliferation was notable.

"While these two conflicts grabbed international headlines, the world ignored the ongoing civil war in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), which is killing 1,000 people per day. It is estimated that almost four million people have died in the last six years, making this the deadliest conflict since the Second World War."

 

The World Bank's "Global Economic Prospects 2005", launched in November, 2004, advises countries concluding bilateral and regional trade pacts to keep them "open", so as not to divert trade or cause market distortions that penalize other developing countries. For more information, and to download the full report, please visit http://www.worldbank.org/prospects/gep2005

 

"What If (It was all a Big Mistake)?" Rep. Ron Paul of Texas asked in a speech before the US House of Representatives on January 26th.
The Congressman begins, "America’s policy of foreign intervention, while still debated in the early 20th century, is today accepted as conventional wisdom by both political parties. But what if the overall policy is a colossal mistake, a major error in judgment? Not just bad judgment regarding when and where to impose ourselves, but the entire premise that we have a moral right to meddle in the affairs of others? Think of the untold harm done by years of fighting-- hundreds of thousands of American casualties, hundreds of thousands of foreign civilian casualties, and unbelievable human and economic costs. What if it was all needlessly borne by the American people? If we do conclude that grave foreign policy errors have been made, a very serious question must be asked: What would it take to change our policy to one more compatible with a true republic’s goal of peace, commerce, and friendship with all nations?" and goes on to ask some provocative questions, among them:

  • What if we discover that democracy can’t be spread with force of arms?
  • What if we suddenly discover we are the aggressors, and we are losing an unwinnable guerrilla war?
  • What if we discover, too late, that we can’t afford this war-- and that our policies have led to a dollar collapse, rampant inflation, high interest rates, and a severe economic downturn?

Read the entire speech at http://www.house.gov/paul/congrec/congrec2005/cr012605.htm

 

In an interview with Wangari Maathai, winner of the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize, in Grist magazine, Maathai talks about being an environmental activist from outside and inside the government of her native Kenya. Grist asks, "In your Nobel Prize acceptance speech, you talked about the environment as a path to peace: "A degraded environment leads to a scramble for scarce resources and may culminate in poverty and even conflict."

Maathai responds, "Yes, and I think this is a reality in the whole world, not only in Africa, but perhaps more so in Africa. We have not enjoyed peace or enjoyed good government or enjoyed good management of our natural resources, and therefore have had massive poverty and a lot of conflict.

The connection between peace and the environment can be explained using the [analogy of] the traditional African stool, which has three legs that support the base on which we sit. I believe these three legs are symbolic. One represents good management of our natural resources, equitable distribution of the same, and a sense of accountability. Another represents good government - a democratic state that respects humankind so that we can have dignity as human beings. The third represents peace. The base on which we sit is development. If you try to do the development where you have no legs, or where you have two legs or one leg, the base is out of balance. It is unsustainable."

To read the entire interview, go to: http://www.grist.org/news/maindish/2005/02/15/maathai/?source=daily

 
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Funding and Employment Opportunities

The Union of Concerned Scientists is searching for a dynamic, experienced, and committed individual to join our Global Security program as a Washington Representative.

The person they hire will develop and implement strategic plans to influence Congress and the Administration, working directly with members of Congress and their staff, key congressional committees, and federal agencies to advocate for UCS positions and policies on a range of nuclear weapons policy, proliferation, and international security issues. The position requires a minimum of five to seven years of progressively responsible experience working either in Congress, in government, or for NGOs working to influence governmental decision-making.

More details are available at: http://www.ucsusa.org/ucs/about/page.cfm?pageID=888#wr_gs

To apply, email a cover letter, resume, and short (1-2 page) writing sample to: globalsecurity@ucsusa.org by February 16, 2005.

 

id21 is looking for a guest editor for a forthcoming issue of insights education on education in emergency situations, due to be published in June 2005. insights education is the print review of education development research published by id21 at the UK Institute of Development Studies.

As guest editor, you could choose to focus on educational issues in any particular context: before, during or after emergency situations, during post-conflict reconstruction, within emergency preparedness or prevention - depending on your research expertise and knowledge. It is essential that your research is related to developing countries and has a strong policy focus.

If selected, your role as guest editor would be to collaborate with id21 on this issue of insights education. In particular, you would help to decide the issue's should focus be, who else should contribute (so as to provide a fair picture of recent research within the chosen area), and write the editorial. The editorial attempts to provide an overview of the current debates, tie together the different ideas discussed in individual articles and move the debate(s) forward in terms of policy.

If you are interested please send a proposal (maximum 1200 words) which includes a brief outline of your proposed theme with an explanation of its relevance to id21’s target readership of southern policy-makers and development practitioners; and a list of between six and ten additional contributors and a brief explanation of what they might cover in terms of current debates, research and policy.

Joint applications are welcome and remuneration is provided. Please see http://www.id21.org/insights/index.html for recent past issues of insights. CLOSING DATE: MARCH 4, 2005
Please send proposals to:
Sandra Baxter, id21 Education Editor
Institute of Development Studies
University of Sussex
Brighton BN1 9RE
UK
Fax: +44 (0) 1273 877 335
Email: s.baxter@ids.ac.uk

 
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EPS Publications

EPS is pleased to announce the release of the first in a series of Fact Sheets. This first issue presents an overview of Military vs. Social Spending: Warfare or Human Welfare. In an accessible, graphic format, it compares US and global military spending with the costs of achieving the UN Millennium Development Goals. The fact sheet, which was compiled and designed by former Project Manager, Paul Burkholder, is available in PDF format at http://www.epsusa.org/publications/factsheets/milexMDG.pdf.

 

The ECAAR Review 2003. Titled Conflict or Development?, this edition has a regional focus on Africa, the site of most of the world's current armed conflicts. In its pages some of the leading economists of the day analyze and reflect on the relationships among military spending, domestic and foreign policy, security, and human welfare. Features include country studies and sections on business and conflict and "Trends in World Military Expenditure." Written in clear English, with informative maps, tables, and graphs, the series is designed to inform the debate among policymakers, activists, journalists, academics, students, and citizens worldwide.

You can order the Review at http://www.ecaar.org/Review_files/order.htm.

We believe the Review can be a valuable teaching tool in economics, political science, and international relations courses. If you are interested in teaching this book, please contact Thea Harvey (theaharvey@epsusa.org) for a copy to review.

 

The Full Cost of Ballistic Missile Defense. The study estimates that the total lifecycle cost for a layered missile defense system could reach $1.2 trillion through 2035. You can order a copy of the report from the cosponsor of the study, http://www.armscontrolcenter.org/nmd/fullcost.html, or download the PDF file from http://www.armscontrolcenter.org/nmd/fullcost.pdf.
 
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Action Corner
Rep. Jim Leach, R-Iowa, had introduced legislation to create a Truman Committee on Iraq in the House early last year. It was followed last September by a Senate resolution with the same goal, co-sponsored by Sens. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., and Larry Craig, R-Idaho. Until this week, both efforts had stalled.

Now Leach, together with Rep. John Tierney, D-Mass., are looking at what is the best way to revive the Truman Committee bill and bring it to the floor. "We're going to put out a 'Dear Colleague' letter this week to see how many co-sponsors we can get for the legislation. This is more urgent now than it was when I first introduced the bill. We have to give the public confidence that their money is being used wisely. Accountability is difficult at home and much more difficult abroad, so oversight is even more critical," said Rep. Leach recently. Rep. Tierney agrees. "Accountability and transparency are critical. Just as Harry Truman fought for Congress to play a special oversight role during World War II, I believe we are called again to shed light on any potential abuse of taxpayer dollars."

To notify your Congressional representative that you support the creation of a committee to investigate the awarding and carrying out of contracts to conduct activities in Afghanistan and Iraq and to fight the war on terrorism, please go to http://www.house.gov and type in your zip code to find your Representative. The bill was due to be introduced Feb. 16, 2005 and at press time did not yet have a bill number.

 

Anyone who would be willing to put an EPS flyer up on a departmental bulletin board or similar venue, please contact Thea Harvey, Development Manager at theaharvey@epsusa.org.
 
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Upcoming Events

February 22, 2005. The Security Policy Working Group presents Home by Christmas? Near-term US Strategies for Exiting Iraq 10:30am - 1:00pm, Tuesday, February 22, 2005. Hyatt Regency Capitol Hill, 400 New Jersey Avenue NW, Washington, DC. Speakers will be:
  • Carl Conetta, co-director, Project on Defense Alternatives;
  • David Cortright, president, Fourth Freedom Forum; Fellow, Kroc Institute, University of Notre Dame;
  • Jamie Galbraith, University of Texas, School of Public Affairs; chair, Economists for Peace and Security;
  • Charles V. Peña, Director of Defense Studies, Cato Institute.

Contact: Sean Meyer, 413-259-9129, for more information & RSVP. smeyer@seanmeyer.com

 

February 24, 2005. Sixth Annual WIIS Career Fair presented by Women In International Security. 4:00 pm - 8:00 pm, at the Ronald Reagan Building & International Trade Center, 1300 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC. More info at http://www.idealist.org/en/events/74966:78/88534:314

 

February 25, 2005. The Study Group on the Economics of Security in the Post-9/11 World will feature a presentation by Leon V. Sigal on "Nuclear Non-Proliferation: Buying out Iran and North Korea." Mr. Sigal, who is just back from meetings in Korea, is the director of the Northeast Asia Cooperative Security Project at the Social Science Research Council in New York. His most recent book, "Hang Separately: Cooperative Security Between the United States and Russia, 1985-1994," was published by the Century Foundation in 2000. The event will take place at the New School University Parsons Building, 66 Fifth Avenue (between 12th and 13th streets) Room 720 (same room as last month), New York, NY. 2:00pm for coffee and snacks. The presentation will begin at 2:30. Please RSVP to berrigaf@newschool.edu

 

February 27, 2005. Resurrecting Empire: US Policy in the Middle East, lecture by Rashid Khalidi, Edward Said Professor for Arab Studies at Columbia University, presented by the Peace Task Force at the Unitarian Church of All Souls, in the Reidy Friendship Hall, 1157 Lexington Ave (at 80th St.), New York, NY, at 1:00pm. See http://www.peacetaskforcenyc.org for more information.

 

March 4 - 6, 2005. The 31st annual Eastern Economic Association Conference will be held in New York, NY, at the Sheraton New York Hotel and Towers. EPS is hosting a session Saturday, March 5th, at 11:00am, on The Costs of War. The presenters will be:

* Jurgen Brauer, US Military Expenditure: Data, Models, Coefficients
* David Gold, The Economics of Terrorism and Counterterrorism
* Lawrence Klein, The Macroeconomics of Preventive War: What Has Iraq Done to the US Economy.

Conference program and other information areavailable at http://www.iona.edu/academic/arts_sci/orgs/eea/conf2005/NYhome.html.

 

March 5, 2005. Empire and Terror in the Nuclear Age. Zia Mian, physicist with the Program on Science and Global Security at Princeton University, and founding member of the Pakistan Peace Coalition (PCC) will speak. Presented by the Peace Task Force at the Unitarian Church of All Souls, in the Reidy Friendship Hall, 1157 Lexington Ave (at 80th St.), New York, NY, at 1:00pm. See http://www.peacetaskforcenyc.org for more information.

 

March 18, 2005. The Study Group on the Economics of Security in the Post-9/11 World at 66 W 12th Street, Room 510, New York, NY at 2:00pm.

 

March 28 – April 1, 2005. Peacebuilding, Conflict Transformation and Post-War Rebuilding, Reconciliation and Resolution (PCTR) five-days advanced international training programme, Cluj-Napoca, Romania. More information at http://www.transcend.org.

 

April 15-17, 2005: The Control Arms Campaign (Amnesty International, IANSA and Oxfam), the Africa Peace Forum (APFO), the Arias Foundation and Saferworld host the Global Campaign conference in Nairobi, Kenya.
The agenda includes:
  • latest developments on the Arms Trade Treaty, the Control Arms campaign, and on regional, national and local arms control campaigns
  • exchanging campaigning experience from different perspectives - across different regions, across target groups and across disciplines,
  • planning strategy for the next year and developing action plans at every level
  • sharing tips tools and techniques to inspire action on the arms crisis at global, regional, national and local levels discussing how we can support each other and mobilize others to join the campaign

COST: Accommodation and meals: Approx $57USD = £30 GBP per night. Registration form at http://www.iansa.org/regions/cafrica/documents/nairobi-invite-en.doc

 

April 18 – 22, 2005. Globalization from below: strategies and actions for social transformation and nonviolent struggle – learning from and building local and global movements, Cluj-Napoca, Romania. More information at http://www.transcend.org.

 

April 22, 2005. The Study Group on the Economics of Security in the Post-9/11 World at 66 W 12th Street, Room 510, New York, NY at 2:00pm.

 

May 12, 2005. "Can International Treaties Promote Disarmament and Development?" A seminar promoting transferring funds from military uses to development uses, will be presented by the Alliance for the Global Wellness Fund Treaty, at the UN (room to be announced), from 1:15pm to 2:45pm. More information on the event and the treaty at http://www.globalwellnesstreaty.org.

 

May 20, 2005. The Study Group on the Economics of Security in the Post-9/11 World at 66 W 12th Street, Room 510, New York, NY at 2:00pm.

 

June 9 - 14, 2005. Women In International Security 2005 Summer Symposium for Graduate Students in International Affairs, Washington, DC, US. http://www.idealist.org/en/events/74966:78/87995:116.

 

June 27 - July 1, 2005. Week I of the Peacebuilding and Development Summer Institute 2005 at American University, Washington, DC. The Peacebuilding and Development Institute provides knowledge, practical experience and skills for scholars and practitioners involved in conflict resolution, peacebuilding, humanitarian assistance and development. http://www.american.edu/sis/peace/summer/.

 

July 5 - July 9, 2005. Week II of the Peacebuilding and Development Summer Institute 2005 at American University, Washington, DC. The Peacebuilding and Development Institute provides knowledge, practical experience and skills for scholars and practitioners involved in conflict resolution, peacebuilding, humanitarian assistance and development. http://www.american.edu/sis/peace/summer/.

 

July 11 - July 15, 2005. Week III of the Peacebuilding and Development Summer Institute 2005 at American University, Washington, DC. The Peacebuilding and Development Institute provides knowledge, practical experience and skills for scholars and practitioners involved in conflict resolution, peacebuilding, humanitarian assistance and development. http://www.american.edu/sis/peace/summer/.

 

July 16 - August 6, 2005. Alliance for Conflict Transformation Summer Institute in Santa Cruz, Bolivia
Applications now being accepted for this 3-week intensive course for English speaking professionals, graduate and upper-level undergraduate students. http://www.conflicttransformation.org

 

September 29 - October 2, 2005. AMI 2005 Monetary Reform Conference This Conference marks the beginning of a new phase in the move for American monetary reforms (and thereby World reforms) so clearly needed to promote economic justice as we enter the 3rd Millennium of the Christian period. These monetary reforms are minimal initial steps necessary to begin moving humanity back from the brink of nuclear war; away from a World dominated by fraud and ugliness and toward a World of justice and beauty. For more information on the conference and the philosophies behind it, please visit: http://www.monetary.org/2005conference

 

November 10 - 12, 2005. European Association for Evolutionary Political Economy (EAEPE) presents its annual conference in Bremen, Germany. The theme of the conference is A New Deal for the New Economy? Global and Local Developments, and New Institutional Arrangements. Papers are still being accepted. For further information please visit the EAEPE website (http://www.eaepe.org/) or http://www.iiso.uni-bremen.de/elsner or contact the local organizers: Wolfram Elsner at welsner@uni-bremen.de and Rebecca Schmitt at rschmitt@uni-bremen.de

 

November 11 - 12, 2005. International Conference on Conflict and Sustainable Peace in East and Southeast Asia, University of Western Sydney, Australia. For details, contact Professor Manas Chatterji by phone (607) 777-2475 or e-mail mchatter@binghamton.edu.

 

December 28 - 30, 2005. Second International Conference on Conflict and Peace in South Asia, Jaipur, India. For details, contact Professor Manas Chatterji by phone (607) 777-2475 or e-mail mchatter@binghamton.edu.

 

January 12 - 14, 2006. Second International Meeting on Disaster Management, Colombo, Sri Lanka. For details, contact Professor Manas Chatterji by phone (607) 777-2475 or e-mail mchatter@binghamton.edu.
 
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How Can I Help?

If you are considering buying a book online, please take a look at WhatWeGive.com (http://www.whatwegive.com/). They have tens of thousands of titles available at a discount to you, and EPS receives twenty percent of your purchase price. After you check out, a pop up window will ask for information about the organization to which you wish your donation to go. Enter Organizational Account # 32 and "Economists Allied for Arms Reduction" in the organization field, and your purchase will be credited to our account.

 

Please consider becoming a member of EPS. Your annual membership entitles you to discounts on publications, invitations to events, our informative newsletters, and more. Most importantly, by joining us you help to ensure that reasoned perspectives on essential economic issues will continue to be heard. Membership dues and other donations are fully tax-deductible. Visit http://www.epsusa.org/membership/membership.htm for more information.

 

If you have enjoyed this issue of EPS NewsNotes, or if you wish to support our mission, please consider making a donation to EPS. You can do so securely online through our website or by sending a check to:

Economists for Peace and Security
at the Levy Economics Institute
PO Box 5000
Annandale-on-Hudson, NY 12504
USA

If you have any questions call +1 (845) 768-0917, or email info@epsusa.org.

 

*For more information about EPS, please visit our website www.epsusa.org.
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