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NEWS NOTES
October 2004

NewsNotes is a monthly email update of goings-on at ECAAR. In it you will find information on current projects, announcements of upcoming events and publications, and an action corner. We would like to include information on what our members are doing. If you would like to submit information about an event or publication that you are involved with, please send an email to theaharvey@ecaar.org. (The fine print - we reserve the right to edit submissions for space or content.)

 IN THIS ISSUE (click on a heading to jump to that section):
*ECAAR News
*Links
*In Other News
*Funding Opportunities
*ECAAR Publications
*Action Corner
*Upcoming Events
*How Can I Help?


*ECAAR NEWS*

* We are proud to announce the formation of our new Spanish affiliate. Under the leadership of Juan Carlos Martinez Coll at the University of Malaga, Economistas por la Paz y la Seguridad have launched a website and are already planning activities. The website is: http://www.eumed.net/paz/index.htm; submissions are welcome. They have opened a database of 'Textos de economía, paz y seguridad' at http://www.eumed.net/paz/tepys/index.htm

* EPS-Spain have organized the First Virtual International Meeting on Economia de la Paz y la Seguridad. The meeting will be conducted via the internet, entirely in Spanish, January 11- 21, 2005. Additional information and call for papers are at http://www.eumed.net/eve/.

*Call for volunteers. We need volunteers to translate ECAAR texts (like the newsletter) into Spanish. Contact at http://www.eumed.net/paz/voluntarios.htm

* Our Program Manager, Paul Burkholder, is leaving ECAAR, as of this month. He is moving to Michigan to pursue love and other projects. Paul had been with ECAAR since 2002, first as an intern then as full time staff. He was instrumental in the success of our "Inequality and the Media" project, and recently launched the Fact Sheet series. We wish him all the best in all his future endeavors.

* The annual meeting of the European Association for Evolutionary Political Economy (EAEPE) will be held October 28-31 in Rethymnon, Crete (Greece). The program includes a plenary address by Michael D. Intriligator, ECAAR Vice-chair, speaking on Globalization of the World Economy: Potential Benefits and Costs and a Net Assessment, as well as sessions with Wolfram Elsner, chair of ECAAR-Germany; J. Paul Dunne, chair of ECAAR-UK, and several ECAAR members, in addition to many others.  More information, and a downloadable schedule and program is available at http://eaepe.org/eaepe.php?q=node/view/92

* ECAAR will be sponsoring three sessions at the ASSA/AEA meetings in Philadelphia in January, as well as our annual membership meeting, and our annual dinner, this year in honor of Robert M. Solow. The sessions will be on The Abuse of Power, the Economics of Space Weapons, and in a joint session with URPE and AEA, US Military Spending and the Economy. For more information on presenters, times and locations see http://www.ecaar.org/Events/aea2005.htm. We will also have a display table in the exhibits area with more information on our activities, as well as sign up for or renew your membership; we hope to see you there.

* The 31st annual Eastern Economic Association Conference will be held March 4-6 in New York, NY. ECAAR is organizing a session, about which more information will follow. If you would like to present a paper, or your organization would like to sponsor a session, contact Dr. Mary H. Lesser by telephone at (914) 633-2088, fax: (914) 633-2549, or e-mail: mailto:mlesser@iona.edu. Submission form and other conference info are available at http://www.iona.edu/eea . Early bird submission deadline for papers is October 15, 2004 and the final deadline for papers and organized sessions is November 12, 2004.

* Wolfram Elsner, chair of ECAAR-Germany, invites you to organize a session at the 2005 EAEPE conference in Bremen, Germany. The European Association for Evolutionary Political Economy (EAEPE) offers an important pluralist international discussion forum for heterodox economists and issues in a broad sense, and in terms of its membership it represents one of the biggest economics associations in Europe. In preparation for the 2005 annual meetings, the EAEPE Council has decided to make this event a broad international discussion forum and to invite guest associations and initiatives from a widely varied political-economic spectrum to contribute their own themes, sessions and panels. EAEPE's Scientific Committee will be glad to consider your suggestions for the final programme.

The title of next year's meetings is A New Deal for the New Economy? Global and Local Developments, and New Institutional Arrangements. The globalization of production is accompanied by an increasing fragmentation of the value-added chains. These changes may provide opportunities for development and improvements in overall economic well-being. Innovative activities play a key role to realize this potential. On the other hand these transformations bear increasing risks for conflict, interventionism and even terrorism as a result of worsening global inequalities. Different forms of socio-economic coordination and cooperation problems require the development of coordinating and conflict-mediating institutional arrangements. The EAEPE Conference 2005 will offer a forum for discussing these topics. Please contact Dr. Elsner by telephone at +49-421-218-7535, or email elsner@uni-bremen.de for more information.

* ECAAR member Ahmad Faruqui recently wrote about ECAAR, global military spending, and the UN Millenium Development Goals in the Pakistani Daily Times. His article, Missing in Action: the Peace Dividend, refers extensively to our recently released Fact Sheet at http://www.ecaar.org/factsheets/milexMDG.pdf.

Dr. Faruqui wrote: "Economists often regard war as an external disruption of the normal peaceful course of events. Yet war and large military budgets have reduced human welfare and harmed the environment far more than the macroeconomic problems that economists regard as their primary business. By giving only 10 percent of what they spend on their militaries for social and human development, world leaders can fully fund the Millennium Development Goals…

"About half of the world's military expenditure is incurred by the United States. To put American military spending in perspective, for every dollar that the US spent on overseas development assistance, it spent $25 dollars on defense. Even though the Cold War ended more than 15 years ago, a large portion of American defense spending goes to legacy systems… The military utility of these weapons in combating the threats posed by Al Qaeda and other terrorist groups is zero. By canceling these programmes, the US would be able to raise the amount of its overseas development aid by 60 percent and deal directly with the root causes of terrorism rather than its after-effects.

Another questionable item in the US defense budget is Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD), which is estimated to cost $1,200 billion over its lifetime ( http://www.armscontrolcenter.org/nmd/fullcost.pdf). BMD may be disabled by much less expensive countermeasures by other nations. If it is shut down, not only would a new expensive arms race be avoided; the funds could also be used to fight extreme poverty and hunger."

Dr. Faruqui is an economist and author of Rethinking the National Security of Pakistan. He can be reached at mailto:faruqui@pacbell.net. You can read the entire article at http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=story_8-10-2004_pg3_2

* The Berkeley Electronic Press has launched a new journal of economic analysis and opinion called The Economists' Voice, edited by Nobel laureate and ECAAR Board member Joseph Stiglitz. Aaron Edlin and Bradford Delong, both professors at the University of California, Berkeley, will co-edit the journal. The electronic journal can be read at http://www.bepress.com/ev. Recent contributions include: Richard A. Posner, Eldred and Fair Use; Joseph Stiglitz, The Parties' Flip-Flops on Deficit Spending: Economics or Politics?; J. Bradford DeLong, Should We Still Support Untrammelled International Capital Mobility? Or are Capital Controls Less Evil than We Once Believed?; and John Donohue, Clinton and Bush's Report Cards on Crime Reduction: The Data Show Bush Policies Are Undermining Clinton Gains.

* Two of ECAAR's Board Members weigh in on the effects of the Bush tax cuts and large deficits:

Robert Reich, writing for tompaine.com, calls for Dogma-free Deficits: "Republican supply-siders have told us for years that tax cuts alone will generate enough private investment to grow the economy, and that growth will dwarf the budget deficits which the tax cuts contributed to. So far, their prediction remains only a prediction. Based on the records of the Reagan administration and that of George W. Bush so far, I have my doubts. But there’s another case to be made on the other side of the political aisle, by what we might call liberal supply-siders. It is that public investments in education, job training, infrastructure, and basic research and development would more than pay for themselves as they spurred growth of the nation’s productive capacity." http://www.tompaine.com/articles/dogmafree_deficits.php

Joseph Stiglitz, speaking at Swarthmore College, was rather more partisan. His message was: the much-heralded tax cuts did not work. "In fact, according to Stiglitz, no economist would believe that the Bush tax cuts were designed to spur on the staggering United States economy... Furthermore, Stiglitz noted that the United States was contributing to 'enormous global financial instability' by borrowing nearly $1.5 billion a day from various global markets. With volatile exchange rates and a vulnerable economy, Stiglitz noted that American households were facing increasing bankruptcy rates and more indebtedness." http://phoenix.swarthmore.edu/2004-10-07/news/14301

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 *LINKS*

* The European Social Forum was launched from the World Social Forum meeting in Porto Alegre, Brazil. Its first two gatherings were in Florence (2002) and Paris (2003). The ESF is an opportunity where social movements, trade unions, NGOs, refugees, peace and anti-imperialist groups, anti-racist movements, environmental movements, networks of the excluded, and community campaigns from Europe and the world can come together to discuss how to achieve global social justice for all and debate ways of making "another world possible." The European Social Forum 2004 is being held in London, UK on October 14-17. Visit http://www.fse-esf.org/en/ for more information.

* The Lawyers' Committee on Nuclear Policy (LCNP, http://www.lcnp.org) uses national and international law to promote peace and disarmament. LCNP provides legal information and analysis to policy makers, diplomats, activists, and the media on disarmament and international law; publishes books, articles and discussion papers for policy makers, lawyers, legal scholars and laypeople; provides legal resources to individuals and organizations using law to work for disarmament; and works through international diplomatic bodies, including the United Nations and the International Court of Justice, to promote peace and disarmament.


*IN OTHER NEWS*

* The Study Group on the Economics of Security in the Post 9/11 World resumes meeting on Friday, October 15th at the New School. The topic of this month's group will be "Economic and Budgetary Aspects of the War on Terror," led by David Gold, Professor of Economics with the New School's Graduate Program in International Affairs and Cindy Williams, Senior Research Fellow in MIT's Security Studies Program. The group will meet at the New School University Parsons Building, 66 Fifth Avenue (between 12th and 13th streets) in Room 720. Please join us at 2:00pm for coffee and snacks. The presentation will begin at 2:30. Please RSVP to berrigaf@newschool.edu.

* With sadness, IANSA (the International Action Network on Small Arms) announces that one of its members was murdered in the massacre at Gatumba refugee camp in Burundi in August. Pastor Jacques Rutekereza, who worked as a human rights advocate with the group SOS Droits de l'Homme en Catastrophe, was among 164 Congolese civilians killed on the night of August 13. 106 other people were wounded. The attack was conducted with assault rifles and incendiary grenades. Many of the corpses were left mutilated, headless or burned beyond recognition, while mothers were clearly killed trying to shield their children.

The attackers are believed to have been associated with several armed groups from the Great Lakes region, including the Burundian FNL. SOS and two other IANSA member organizations, Colonie des Pionniers de Developpement and AVREO, report that the situation in the area is still very dangerous and confused. We send our condolences and solidarity to the family and colleagues of Pastor Rutekereza.

Human Rights Watch has produced a report on the massacre at http://hrw.org/backgrounder/africa/burundi/2004/0904/

* The Eisenhower Institute is pleased to invite you to the first of this year's author series events on Monday, October 25th featuring Ambassador Thomas Graham, Jr., author of Common Sense on Weapons of Mass Destruction. The event will take place from 5:30-7:30pm at The Eisenhower Institute located at 915 15th Street, NW, Washington, DC.

Common Sense on Weapons of Mass Destruction puts forward, in a straightforward and comprehensive manner, the background necessary to understand the news and opinions surrounding weapons of mass destruction (WMDs). Graham believes that a tide of misinformation has led to the public's lack of understanding of the vital issues surrounding WMDs. This book presents accessible and up-to-date facts on nuclear proliferation and nuclear terrorism, chemical and biological weapons, land mines and small arms missile defense and WMDs in outer space and in the Middle East and Asia.

Ambassador Graham served for several decades as general counsel and acting director of the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency. He was President Clinton's special ambassador for nuclear disarmament to indefinitely extend the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. Currently, he is special counsel at Morgan, Lewis and Bockius, LLP in Washington, DC and teaches classes in international law and arms control.

There is no charge for this event, but seating is limited and a reservation is required. To make a reservation for this limited-seating event, please register via their website at http://www.eisenhowerinstitute.org/events, or contact Jane Kratovil at (703) 626-2650.

* The first issue of the Journal Of Institutional Economics (JOIE) will appear in June 2005 published by Cambridge University Press. JOIE is devoted to the study of the nature, role and evolution of institutions in the economy, including firms, states, markets, money, households and other vital institutions and organizations. It welcomes contributions by all schools of thought that can contribute to our understanding of the features, development and functions of real world economic institutions and organizations.

JOIE is soliciting potential book review authors. They plan to publish longer review articles of 1-4 books on a common theme. These review articles will be refereed; publication will depend on the referees' reports and the decision of the editors, like all other articles published in the journal. If you are interested, please email a 100-500 word proposal, including details of the books to be reviewed, the common theme involved, and the kind of arguments and avenues that you will explore in your review essay, and a copy of your CV, to Geoff Hodgson, JOIE Editor-in-Chief, mailto: g.m.hodgson@herts.ac.uk. The editors will then select the most promising and suitable proposals, and commission the review articles accordingly. Please visit http://www.joie-foundation.com/ for more information on the journal.

* An Analysis of the Recent Deterioration in the Fiscal Condition of the U.S. Government by the Center for American Progress' Senior Fellow, Scott Lilly, was recently released. "In early September, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) released its estimate of the fiscal 2004 federal budget deficit, indicating that government outlays would exceed revenues by a total of $422 billion - the largest deficit in history. The fiscal '04 deficit exceeds the previous record, a $375 billion deficit set just last year, by nearly 13 percent. Even more striking than the size of these deficits is the speed with which the nation has developed them. As recently as fiscal 2001, the federal budget was still in surplus, and as recently as fiscal 2000, the nation had the largest budget surplus in its history...

"The negative effects of slower than normal growth and low inflation have been offsets by low interest rates. Higher military, intelligence, and defense spending, and increases in domestic spending, including homeland security and first responders expenses, contributed to the deterioration of the nation's fiscal condition. Between fiscal 2000 and fiscal 2004 federal outlay grew by a total of 19 percent, which was 12 percent faster than the economy was growing.

"Overall spending grew from 18.4 percent of GDP in fiscal 2000 to 19.8 percent in 2004. As substantial as that growth was, the federal budget would have run a surplus in fiscal 2004 if it had continued to collect the same share of GDP in revenue. Fiscal 2004 expenditures of $2,293 billion would have been offset by revenues of $2,409 billion if the federal government had collected 20.8 percent of GDP in revenues as it did in fiscal 2000." To read the entire report go to:
http://www.americanprogress.org/atf/cf/{E9245FE4-9A2B-43C7-A521-5D6FF2E06E03}/fiscaldeterioration.pdf

* The NGO Committee on Disarmament, Peace, and Security at the United Nations is sponsoring several panels in October and November:

  • Wednesday, October 20, 1:30-5:30pm in UN Conference Room B: Major Conventional Weapons: Their Global Spread And The Links To War, WMD, And Military Spending. These sessions are co-sponsored by the World Conference of Religions for Peace.
  • Thursday, October 21, 10:00am: the UN DPI (Dept. of Public Information) briefing in the Dag Hammarskjold Library Auditorium will focus on The Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty.
  • Thursday, October 21, 1:30-4:00pm in UN Conference Room B: Prospects For Peace And Security In Outer Space.
  • Thursday, November 18, 1:15-2:45pm, in UN Conference Room 5: The Role Of NGOs In Achieving Disarmament.

If you would like to attend one of these events and do not have a UN pass, contact the NGO Committee on Disarmament, Peace and Security at (212) 687-5340. For more information visit http://www.igc.org/disarm.

* NGOs operating in Angola called on donors not to neglect the country's critical transitional phase as it moves from an emergency situation into a longer-term development context. "Post-war states are very vulnerable; civil society is fragile; the population is extremely weak - this time is much more complex than the emergency phase," Allan Cain, director of Development Workshop told IRIN, the news agency of the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. "Because it's a new phenomenon in Africa, most donors, and especially the UN, don't have the institutions, programmes or funds to deal with the post-war situation," Cain said. For more details see http://www.irinnews.org/report.asp?ReportID=43444

* id21, the development research reporting service of the Institute for Development Studies at the University of Sussex, recently focused on the Millennium Development Goals. Several articles explore whether any progress has been made towards the goals and lessons learned thus far. See http://www.id21.org/society/index.html for links to individual articles.

* Alert 2004: Report on Conflicts, Human Rights and Peace-building is a study by the Alert Unit at the School of Peace Culture at Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, providing an overview of the world situation at the end of the year on the basis of an analysis of 36 indicators, divided into 9 large groups: armed conflicts, situations of tension and high-risk disputes, peace processes, post-war rehabilitation (international involvement), humanitarian crises, militarization and disarmament, human rights and International Humanitarian Law, development, and conduct in relation to the international community.

In a year that was so marked in the mass media by the war in Iraq, the data presented in this "Alert 2004!" report show that global security will not be achieved by intensifying interventionist military policies and spreading feelings of hatred and suspicion, but by concentrating the policies of individual states and the strategies of both regional and international bodies on the structural resolution of the points set out here in the form of indicators, achieving a broad consensus that will divert the many tendencies that are currently marginalizing, impoverishing and destroying. For the School of Peace Culture, this commitment to advance towards proper compliance with standards that are within universal reach, to return to the principles of demilitarization and the creation of trust, to strengthen the promotion and protection of human rights, to reduce gender inequalities, to fight against corruption and social injustice, to achieve sustainable growth, and to firmly support the diplomacy of peace -these are the paths that could really offer the capacity to deactivate the destructive forces and dynamics of confrontation, imbalance and inequality that exist in our world, as clearly shown in this report.
http://www.pangea.org/unescopau/

* Over 650 foreign affairs specialists in the United States and allied countries have signed an open letter opposing the Bush administration's foreign policy and calling urgently for a change of course. The letter was released October 12th by Security Scholars for a Sensible Foreign Policy (http://www.sensibleforeignpolicy.net/), a nonpartisan group of experts in the field of national security and international politics. "We're advising the administration, which is already in a deep hole, to stop digging," said Professor Richard Samuels of M.I.T.

The scholars who signed the letter include many of the nation's most prominent experts on world politics, including former staff members at the Pentagon, the State Department and the National Security Council, as well as six of the last seven Presidents of the American Political Science Association. "I think it is telling that so many specialists on international relations, who rarely agree on anything, are unified in their position on the high costs that the U.S. is incurring from this war," said Professor Robert Keohane of Duke University. The full text of the letter is available at http://www.sensibleforeignpolicy.net/letter.html.


*FUNDING AND EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES*

* The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill seeks an outstanding scholar in national and international security (broadly defined) to teach courses in an interdisciplinary community of faculty (the Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense, http://www.unc.edu/depts/pwad), and in a home department in his or her discipline (history, http://www.unc.edu/depts/history; political science, http://www.unc.edu/depts/polisci; public policy, http://www.unc.edu/depts/pubpol; or others involved in the security studies field. Economists are also welcome to apply). The appointment will be at the advanced assistant professor level, or associate professor with tenure. A letter of interest with a complete curriculum vitae, and four external recommendations, should be sent to Professor Richard H. Kohn, Search Committee Chair, Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense, CB# 3200 (401 Hamilton Hall), UNC Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3200. Applications will be reviewed beginning November 15 and will continue to be reviewed until position is filled. UNC CH is an equal opportunity employer and welcomes women and minority applicants.


*ECAAR PUBLICATIONS*

* ECAAR is pleased to announce the release of the first in a series of Fact Sheets. This first issue presents an overview of Military vs. Social Spending: Warfare or Human Welfare. The fact sheet compares US and global military spending with the costs of achieving the UN Millennium Development Goals in an accessible, graphic format. The fact sheet, which was compiled and designed by ECAAR's Project Manager, Paul Burkholder, is available in PDF format at http://www.ecaar.org/factsheets/milexMDG.pdf

* The ECAAR Review 2003.  Titled "Conflict or Development?" this edition has a regional focus on Africa, the site of most of the world's current armed conflicts.  In its pages some of the leading economists of the day analyze and reflect on the relationships among military spending, domestic and foreign policy, security, and human welfare. Features include country studies and sections on business and conflict and "Trends in World Military Expenditure." Written in clear English, with informative maps, tables, and graphs, the series is designed to inform the debate among policymakers, activists, journalists, academics, students, and citizens worldwide.

You can order the Review at http://www.ecaar.org/Review_files/order.htm   

We believe the Review can be a valuable teaching tool in economics, political science, and international relations courses.  If you are interested in teaching this book, please contact Kate Cell (katecell@ecaar.org) for a copy to review.

* "
The Full Cost of Ballistic Missile Defense"  The study estimates that the total life-cycle cost for a layered missile defense system could reach $1.2 trillion through 2035.  You can order a copy of the report from the co-sponsor of the study, http://www.armscontrolcenter.org/nmd/fullcost.html, or download the PDF file from http://www.armscontrolcenter.org/nmd/fullcost.pdf.


*ACTION CORNER*

* Everyone is urging you to vote, but where do you get more than sound bites about the candidates? The Friends Committee on National Legislation (FCNL) voting information page. Enter your zip code to look up your presidential, congressional and state-level candidates, including their positions on key issues like the economy, the US role in Iraq, and education. Find information on absentee ballots for military and civilians, your state's voting machines and polling stations, and other how-tos at http://www.fcnl.org/elections_2004.htm

* Your vote matters. In the US, register to vote, or update your address or party affiliation, at https://www.workingforchange.com/vote/index.cfm?ms=G00001

* Anyone who would be willing to put an ECAAR flyer up on a departmental bulletin board or similar venue, please contact Thea Harvey, Development Manager at theaharvey@ecaar.org.


*UPCOMING EVENTS*

* October 14-17, 2004. The European Social Forum 2004 is being held in London, UK. Visit http://www.fse-esf.org/en/ for more information.

* October 15, 2004. The Study Group on the Economics of Security in the Post 9/11 World resumes meeting on Friday, October 15th at the New School in New York City. The topic of this month's group will be "Economic and Budgetary Aspects of the War on Terror," led by David Gold, Professor of Economics with the New School's Graduate Program in International Affairs, and Cindy Williams, Senior Research Fellow in MIT's Security Studies Program. The group will meet at the New School University Parsons Building, 66 Fifth Avenue (between 12th and 13th streets) in Room 720. Please join us at 2:00pm for coffee and snacks. The presentation will begin at 2:30. Please RSVP to berrigaf@newschool.edu.

* October 20, 2004. 1:30-5:30pm in UN Conference Room B: The NGO Committee on Disarmament, Peace, and Security at the United Nations is sponsoring two panel discussions on Major Conventional Weapons: Their Global Spread And The Links To War, WMD, And Military Spending. http://www.igc.org/disarm

* October 21, 2004. 10:00am: the UN DPI (Deptartment of Public Information) briefing in the Dag Hammarskjold Library Auditorium will focus on The Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty. http://www.igc.org/disarm

* October 21, 1:30-4:00pm in UN Conference Room B: The NGO Committee on Disarmament, Peace, and Security at the United Nations panel on Prospects For Peace And Security In Outer Space. http://www.igc.org/disarm

* October 25, 2004. The Eisenhower Institute is pleased to invite you to the first of this year's author series events, featuring Ambassador Thomas Graham, Jr., author of Common Sense on Weapons of Mass Destruction. The event will take place from 5:30-7:30pm at The Eisenhower Institute located at 915 15th Street, NW, Washington, DC. http://www.eisenhowerinstitute.org/events

* October 28-31, 2004. The annual meeting of the European Association for Evolutionary Political Economy (EAEPE) will be held in Rethymnon, Crete (Greece). The program includes a plenary address by Michael D. Intriligator, ECAAR Vice-chair, speaking on Globalization of the World Economy: Potential Benefits and Costs and a Net Assessment, as well as sessions with Wolfram Elsner, chair of ECAAR-Germany; J. Paul Dunne, chair of ECAAR-UK, and several ECAAR members, in addition to many others.  More information, and a downloadable schedule and program is available at http://eaepe.org/eaepe.php?q=node/view/92

* November 9, 2004. The Woodrow Wilson Center's Middles East Program's Joseph and Alma Gildenhorn Middle East Forum and the Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace at Stanford University present a Workshop on Iran's Nuclear Program, from 8:30am to 4:00pm in the 6th Floor Auditorium, Woodrow Wilson Center, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Washington, DC. Seating is limited. Please RSVP: mailto: mep@wwic.si.edu or fax 202.691.4184 with your name, title, affiliation and telephone number. For a list of presenters see http://www.wilsoncenter.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=events.events&themonth=11&n_owner_id=95451&theyear=2004

* November 18, 2004. 1:15-2:45pm, in UN Conference Room 5: The NGO Committee on Disarmament, Peace, and Security at the United Nations panel on The Role Of NGOs In Achieving Disarmament http://www.igc.org/disarm

* November 22-26, 2004. Peacebuilding, Conflict Transformation & Post War Reconstruction and Resolution. A Five-Day International Training Programme for Practitioners, Policy Makers, International and National Agency Staff and NGOs working in peacebuilding, conflict transformation and post-war recovery, at the Romanian Peace Institute in Cluj-Napoca, Romania. Sponsored by TRANSCEND and PATRIR. Cost 450 - 750. http://www.transcend.org/tpu/courses.shtml.

* December 17-19, 2004. The Global Reconciliation Network hosts Towards Harmony: Conflict Resolution and Reconciliation, a meeting to address issues concerning the sources of conflict that arise out of the action of global processes, such the operation of the World Economic Forum and the World Social Forum, in New Delhi, India. Themes to be addressed at the meeting will include the following: local conditions of conflict and possibilities for cross-cultural dialogues within specific communities; local rights to the use of resources versus the conditions imposed by the globalized economy; community rights to environmental self determination as opposed to the sovereign rights of states; the concept of, and the possibilities for, “multiculturalism” in Western and non-Western societies; perceptions of the West from non-Western societies, and vice versa; the ethics of terrorism and responses to it; and the possibilities for civil society based movements for global cooperation and conflict resolution. Participants will address a range of issues relating to regional and international conflicts, and strategies based on action within local communities to promote reconciliation. Participants will include people working in India itself in this field, including representatives of academic institutions and community based organizations, and international contributors with experience in both theoretical and practical aspects of these issues. For more information visit http://globalreconciliationnetwork.org, or register online at http://www.idealist.org/en/events/102917:48/87161:202

* January 7-9, 2005. The annual meetings of the Allied Social Sciences Associations (ASSA) and the American Economics Association (AEA) in Philadelphia, PA. For more information, see http://www.vanderbilt.edu/AEA/anmt.htm .

* January 11- 21, 2005. Economists for Peace and Security-Spain have organized the First Virtual International Meeting on Economia de la Paz y la Seguridad. The meeting will be conducted via the internet, entirely in Spanish. Additional information and call for papers are at http://www.eumed.net/eve/.

* March 4-6, 2005. The 31st annual Eastern Economic Association Conference will be held in New York City. If you would like to present a paper, or your organization would like to sponsor a session, contact Dr. Mary H. Lesser by telephone at (914) 633-2088, fax: (914) 633-2549, or e-mail: mailto:mlesser@iona.edu. Submission form and other conference info areavailable at http://www.iona.edu/eea . Early bird submission deadline for papers is October 15, 2004 and the final deadline for papers and organized sessions is November 12, 2004.


*HOW CAN I HELP?*

* If you are considering buying a book online, please take a look at WhatWeGive.com (http://www.whatwegive.com/).  They have tens of thousands of titles available at a discount to you, and ECAAR receives twenty percent of your purchase price. After you check out, a pop up window will ask for information about the organization to which you wish your donation to go. Enter Organizational Account # 32 and "Economists Allied for Arms Reduction" in the organization field, and your purchase will be credited to our account.

* Please consider becoming a member of ECAAR.  Your annual membership entitles you to discounts on publications, invitations to events, our informative newsletters, and more. Most importantly, by joining us you help to ensure that reasoned perspectives on essential economic issues will continue to be heard. Membership dues and other donations are fully tax-deductible. Visit http://www.ecaar.org/Membership.htm for more information.

* If you have enjoyed this issue of ECAAR NewsNotes, or if you wish to support our mission, please consider making a donation to ECAAR.  You can do so securely online through our website at https://www.chi-cash-advance.com/sforms/appeal196/contribute.asp or by sending a check to ECAAR, 39 E. Central Ave., Suite One, Pearl River, NY 10965.  If you have any questions call (845) 620-1542, or email ecaar@ecaar.org.


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